When the smart and green worlds collide in the built environment
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Published: August 29, 2019

admin | Events | 29 August, 2019

    When the smart and green worlds collide in the built environment.

    Buildings are no longer simple structures to live, work and play in. Today’s drive for greater productivity, connectivity, health and satisfaction is raising the bar for buildings to become smarter and to put the needs of its occupants first. They are increasingly defining the quality of life of the people that live and work within their four walls.

     

    SGBC crowded booth 1. Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    SGBC crowded booth 1. Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Smart buildings, which incorporate the latest technologies to improve productivity and comfort while reducing maintenance and operational costs, are gaining popularity as developers strive to ensure that the increased urbanisation caused by rapid population growth and economic development remains sustainable.

    In fact, according to Navigant Research, the smart building sector is estimated to generate USD 8.5bn in revenue in 2020. In separate studies, ABI Research estimates that revenue from commercial building automation in Asia Pacific will grow to over USD 5bn in 2022, with an expected CAGR of 4.7% from 2017 to 2022.

     

    BCA crowded booth 2. Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    BCA crowded booth 2. Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    The key to successful smart architecture – the human factor

    In a rush to implement smart and energy-efficient features, it is easy to lose sight of a key component of smart design – people-centricity. Technology – from data analytics and engineered materials to neuroscience – can be harnessed to contribute to creating an occupant centred, intelligent building. For example, the development of new materials titanium dioxide tiles can filter air pollutants and are revolutionising building facades to contribute to occupant well-being. Other innovations such as photovoltaic tiles are also making buildings more energy efficient.

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    To bring smart architecture to life, it is important to bring technology in early and have a strategic implementation plan. An effective strategy should define a holistic set of requirements that spans across functional areas such as IT, operations, human resources, corporate real estate, and security.

     

    Public and Private Sector Involved

    In Singapore, there has been an active push from the government to incorporate more smart technologies into new and existing buildings. Several initiatives have already been launched by both the public and private sector to encourage adoption. For example, the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) has launched an initiative to convert its flagship Zero Energy Building into a positive energy building using smart technologies. This unique living laboratory for smart building technologies, or an “Office of the Future”, seeks to integrate software, hardware and people elements to provide an exemplary model for the design of the smart and healthy buildings.

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    “With the new era of IoT (Internet of Things) and the ability to interconnect systems, the smartness of the building is defined by the interoperability of all its elements. The building must be adapted to its user, increasing comfort whilst the user is present and saving energy automatically based on user activity,” said Nicolas Sautter, Head of Sauter Asia Pacific Competence Centre.

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Learn more about smart sustainable architecture at International Built Environment Week (IBEW) 2019, with four anchor trade shows being held from 4 – 6 September 2019, Singapore. IBEW is a new flagship event in the Asian region for industry leaders and professionals from the global built environment industry to exchange ideas and experiences on policies, business solutions and technologies, as well as explore business opportunities. The event is expected to attract more than 12,000 attendees from all over the world, with exhibiting companies like Robert Bosch, AGC Glass, Jestac, Dominion House, Igloohome, Commscope, Fortes Innovations and Elkay.

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

     

    The 3-day exhibitions at IBEW 2019 will also feature an exciting line up of key architectural seminars, where experts will share their insights into the latest trends in the sector. Industry leaders at the seminars will include:

    • Abhineet Kaul, Senior Director of Frost & Sullivan Asia Pacific’s Public Sector & Government Practice, who will share Frost and Sullivan’s latest research and insights into what smart and green buildings mean to stakeholders across the built environment ecosystem
    • Michael Budig, Assistant Professor in Architecture and Sustainable Design from Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), who will share the latest on the computational tools available for designers to make informed decisions on environmental performance
    • Chris Mooney, Director of Global Accounts – Asia Pacific at Anixter will highlight the five essentials to creating smart environments: Risk Management, Network Performance, Workforce Productivity, Space Utilisation and Internet of Things Enablement

     

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

    Image © Reed Exhibitions.

     

    IBEW 2019 is organised by the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) of Singapore. IBEW attendees can also sign up for the 3-day International Built Environment Conference (IBEC) where industry leaders and thought leaders will share the latest innovations, best practices and ideology that will shape the entire built environment lifecycle.

     

     

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