ST. Joseph’s Home by SAA Architects Wins Silver At World Architecture News Awards
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Published: November 5, 2019

admin | Company News | 05 November, 2019

    ST.Joseph’s Home by SAA Architects Wins Silver At World Architecture News Awards

    SAA Architects (SAA), a member of Surbana Jurong Group, has earned international acclaim for St. Joseph’s Home, clinching Silver in the healthcare category at the World Architecture News (WAN) Awards 2019. This is the highest accolade received by a Singapore firm at the awards. The WAN Awards is an international award that recognises architectural excellence from around the world.

     

    All communal pockets within the development are designed with vistas towards the chapel. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    All communal pockets within the development are designed with vistas towards the chapel. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

     

    St. Joseph’s Home is the first in Singapore to integrate a childcare centre into a nursing home. Features such as intergenerational friendly playground with wheelchair-friendly seesaw facilitate social interactions between the residents and children. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography

    St. Joseph’s Home is the first in Singapore to integrate a childcare centre into a nursing home. Features such as intergenerational friendly playground with wheelchair-friendly seesaw facilitate social interactions between the residents and children. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography

    St. Joseph’s Home operated by Catholic Welfare Services, provides nursing and hospice services for the elderly, regardless of race or religion. SAA Architects designed and delivered the redevelopment of the 139-bed facility into an integrated 412-bed nursing home in 2017. The design of the nursing home is guided by the Catholic Welfare Services’ philosophy in maintaining a person-centred home that upholds the values of human dignity. The architecture and landscape response imbues urban and universal design principles to create a space that not only enhances the patient and visitor experience, but also maximises engagement and operational efficiency for the care staff who run the home. 

     

     Communal gardens, greenery-lined corridors on each floor, planters and terracotta façade panels with vertical greenery are applied throughout the development to infuse pockets of green spaces on every floor.Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Communal gardens, greenery-lined corridors on each floor, planters and terracotta façade panels with vertical greenery are applied throughout the development to infuse pockets of green spaces on every floor. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

     

    While the terracotta screen facade encloses the landscaped corridors fronting the bedrooms, the living rooms and communal pockets are fully open to maximise day lighting and ventilation. Residents can experience the sight, sound and smell of nature when it rains or shines in the comfort of shelter.. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    While the terracotta screen facade encloses the landscaped corridors fronting the bedrooms, the living rooms and communal pockets are fully open to maximise day lighting and ventilation. Residents can experience the sight, sound and smell of nature when it rains or shines in the comfort of shelter. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    “In designing St. Joseph’s Home, our design approach focused on three key pillars – designing for community, mobility and dignity. Each aspect of the design places residents’ wellbeing at heart; providing for their mobility, engagement and comfort, and enhancing the total quality of care they would receive.” said Mr Michael Leong, SAA Architects, Director.

    The redevelopment involves retaining an existing chapel and annex block, with the chapel as the spiritual heart of the home. SAA’s design positions the chapel as the centre of the nursing home, and all communal pockets within the development are designed with vistas towards it– establishing the chapel as a beacon for the development. SAA maximised the natural ventilation, daylight and sun shading by orientating every ward at an angle determined by the prevailing winds and sunlight in order to provide a comfortable home for the residents. The architects addressed the needs of each category of residents, paying special attention to those with dementia as they tend to be more sensitive to their environment.

     

    Facade encloses the corridor. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Facade encloses the corridor. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Communal gardens, greenery-lined corridors, planters and vertical greenery are applied throughout the development to infuse pockets of green spaces on every floor. Hence, nature is accessible for even the bedridden and wheelchair-bound regardless of the level they reside on. St. Joseph’s Home is the first in Singapore to integrate a childcare centre into a nursing home. Features such as an intergenerational playground with a wheelchair friendly see-saw facilitate social interactions between the residents and children.

     

    Wide and unobstructed corridors run around the periphery of each floor, empowering residents by facilitating mobility. Bedridden residents are given a chance to enjoy the sunlight and be close to greenery outside their rooms, as the wide corridors allow caregivers to wheel their beds around. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Wide and unobstructed corridors run around the periphery of each floor, empowering residents by facilitating mobility. Bedridden residents are given a chance to enjoy the sunlight and be close to greenery outside their rooms, as the wide corridors allow caregivers to wheel their beds around. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

     

    Interior. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Interior. Image © Aaron Pocock Photography.

    Sister Geraldine Tan, Catholic Welfare Services, said, “The centre creates a space where everyone can find a place to co-exist – the young, the older, the dying and the sick. This full circle care model is where we can learn to embrace one another to live in harmony.”

     

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